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investments. >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. and as those things change, fidelity can help you readjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions in the capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. i am cathy kay. oscar pistorious is not the only one on trial for a killing. the lead detective is facing charges of attempted murder. a car bomb explodes in damascus. aind in the deep, we join an expedition hunting for species we may never have seen before. ♪ >> welcome to our viewers on public television and in america. faces chargesuus of killing his g
of the economy, just not in one year. if you look at the nonpartisan shops who have looked at the impact on the economy, they all coalesce around one number. they say this sequestration if it takes effect and holds will take about .5% of gdp growth out of the 2013 economy. now, that doesn't sound very good to me. we were just talking about how the economy's already growing too slow as far as we're concerned. i don't believe the fourth quarter recessionary number. i think that's going to be revised up. but if you think this is an economy that can take a 50-basis point whack to gdp growth, perhaps we're in a different world. >> here's the thing, let's go through this. 44 billion is the real number and it's funny, i found this today courtesy of my friend. what is that? $44 billion of spending cuts is 2 1/4 of 1% of gdp. so these are such tiny -- but the benefits, the benefits of confidence and certainty and free markets, i think vastly overwhelm these keynesian multipliers. >> and there's really no such thing as a keynesian multiplier. i mean -- well, really. >> do we need a stretcher? >> d
the economy, by buying government bonds. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. can two weaklings become strong by teaming up. that's what office depot and office max are hoping for, as they decide to merge. >> tom: and a mixed picture on housing, contractors break ground on more single family homes, but pull back on building apartments and condos. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! how much longer should the federal reserve continue to stimulate the economy? that question was intensely debated at the central bank's policy meeting in january according to the minutes released today. stocks sold off on that news, as investors worry the fed might taper off its stimulus program, sooner than expected, and before its goal of seeing a big pick up in the job market. the fed has been buying $85 billion of mortgage backed securities and treasuries every month to pump up the economy. here's what those fed minutes revealed: "many" policymakers voiced concerns about "potential costs and risks" from more bond buying. others said that the easy-money policies might encourage "excessive risk-taking" a
top stories at this hour -- >> the spanish prime minister says his economy is on the road to recovery. >> violent protests erupt against austerity in bulgaria, forcing the government to resign. >> and wide-board cameras are capturing more than usual in russia -- why dashboard cameras are capturing. it is tough times for spain battling its crippling economic crisis, and to make matters worse, many spanish politicians who are supposed to be leading the country out of the crisis are themselves the target of corruption allegations. >> even spain's prime minister has been implicated, but at his state of the nation address, he skirted the issue, instead playing up economic improvements and announcing a new tough line against corruption. >> it is his first state of the nation address, and it comes at a tough time -- his party is embroiled in a slush fund scandal. but he went on the attack, calling for cross-party support for anti-corruption drive. >> corruption is a problem that alarms the people and affects the image of spain. all corruption is unbearable. it is corrosive for civic spirit.
members urged caution in withdrawing stimulus to the economy prematurely. the fed policy board is expected to examine the effectiveness of its asset purchasing program more closely after its next meeting in march. housing construction is a key indicator of the health of u.s. economy. the number of permits for new construction rose for a third straight month. this suggested recovery in the housing market remains on track. department of commerce officials say housing starts last month came to 890,000 units. that's a decline of 8.5% from december. construction of condos and other multifamily tumbled 26%. the drop was enough to offset a rise. housing permits rose 1.8% from december. that's the highest level since june 2008 before the start of the global financial crisis. let's get a check on tokyo markets. first taking a look at stocks. market sentiment is damaged. the nikkei is trading at 11,423. sources say investors are selling export related issues to take profits after recent gains. moving onto currencies now. the fed minute that hint at scaling back monetary easing has led to dollar buyi
for the economy following a tough recession. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: joe davis joins us now, he's chief economist at vanguard, the giant mutual fund company. >> susie: joe, nice to have you with us on this important day. let me start by asking you, do you think the fed is taking on too much risk? >> i think there is an argument that can be made. we've had a concern for more than a year that there are both costs as well as benefits with respect to very aggressive monetary policy. and just some of the behavior we've seen in the financial markets. i know the report talked about excessive risk-taking. so i've had a concern that those costs associated with monetary policy may not have been given the sort of credence they should have been. so a positive development, in my mind, to today's minutes it was that federal reserve policy-makers were more aggressively talking about both the pros and cons wreaptwith respect to aggressive monetary policy. >> susie: one thing we've been hearing repeatedly from the federal reserve is they're not going to make any change in this policy, raisin
bank. and fidelity investments. >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you adjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are, a fidelity ira has a wide array of choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions in the capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> hello, you are watching "gmt" on "bbc world news." another dramatic twist on the oscar prestorious case. police investigator leading the investigation is facing charges. revelations come as the caribbean fight bail. high unemployment -- as the pair olympian -- paralympian fight for bail. and a hot waters that are home to some very unusual wildlife. also in the program, jamie has a look a
's a measure of the overall economy. wal-mart took in less money. wal-mart sales were down. wal-mart tells the economy's story. what's going on here? well, start with gas prices, up again today, by the way. up nearly 50 cents this year, you can't spend at wal-mart when your gas costs so much more, so suddenly. and then there's taxes up for everyone as of january the 1st. you spend less when your paycheck shrinks, throw in rising unemployment and a president who wants another round of tax hikes and you've got a weak economy. telling me, really? is it all the republicans fault? "varney & company" is about to begin. [ male announcer] surprise -- you're having iplets. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your car needs a new ansmission. [ coyote how ] how about no more surprises? now you can get all the online trading tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> all eyes on the market this morning. question, will the selloff continue? remember, two
. here's what is "money" tonight. it is eight days until the sequester plows into the u.s. economy. who is really facing the most financial pain? how can you make money from it? today's panel cuts through all the washington noise to get you some answers. >>> plus a breakthrough for health care. thousands of self-serve kiosks come to wal-mart and sam's club stores. can free health screenings prove a game-changer for providing care? the founder and ceo of the company behind them joins us. >>> ditch that fancy trip to the caribbean and come get baked in colorado. call jeff sipc oli. it gets green light from colorado regulators. businesses plan to lure tourists and turn colorado into the next amsterdam. will be a hit or the next buzz kill. even when they say it is not it is always about money adam: good evening to you. just eight days and a few hours until the latest government improsed fiscal disaster. eight days until cuts that both sides say they will completely crater the economy take place. and just eight days until budget cuts could tank wall street and the stock market rally which up
accusing each other of letting down the country and letting down the economy during the debate in parliament behind me. >> mean while there were confrontations between protesters and demonstrators in greece. demonstrators are demanding a halt to planned spending cuts and tax hikes. one-third of the 11 million people in greece are unemployed. an associate of -- of a singapore businessman expected of being part of a global match fixing scandal has been arrested in italy. the interval investigation, conducted with the health of -- help of fifa, authorities were tipped off by italian officials. >> delegates have been here for the last few days, discussing how endemic the problem of match fixing is a cross football. they have acknowledged max fixing, a multimillion-dollar business, could be killing the game. >> what we saw in the past was just a little. also, international friendly. i heard from the euro whole press conference -- euro pulled -- euro pol press conference that as of now there is no indication that the organization has been infiltrated. >> the secretary general has den
right. the cuts are not smart. they're not fair. they're going to hurt the economy. but what the president didn't mention, that the sequester, that was his idea in the first place. >> not smart, not fair. it was his idea? let's keep adding it up, boys. today john boehner fired off his latest shot in this blame game. he took to the pages of the "wall street journal" to accuse the president of the united states of creating a financial crisis. boehner said the president's sequester is now eminent. but the daily beast website released some information today to knock down boehner's accusations. you see, back in 2011, boehner's office developed a power point presentation for house republicans. it was a two-step approach, but it actually contained three steps. first of all, no tax hikes. of course that's typical. spending cuts extending the debt ceiling increase, and spending caps. but while pushing those spending caps, boehner did what? he highlighted a special trigger mechanism -- sequestration. boehner was selling this idea to his caucus as a good way to make sure that they were
by the government, the white house who can't even seem to make the slightest bit of improvement in the economy. gerri: the number for the sequester will be half a percent. we are not even talking about curbing growth, but we are talking about a small backtrack. at the end of the day, we are not talking about a lot of money. but i would like to ask you that the president likes wants to spend $50 billion on infrastructure. didn't he do that just a few years ago? didn't we find that spending on roads and bridges was difficult because shovel ready wn't so already? >> thetimulus was $800 billion. the president understood at that time that the american people would buy into anything because they were so desperate. the fact of the matter is when we look back on it, there wasn't enough shovel ready jobs. we didn't see what was promised, it has been about 80% almost the entire presidency. the american people are disappointed time and time again. expectations are low. the president taking stimulus, 50 billion. you could say, well, at least it's not 500 billion, that's many that we don't have. >> there i
at the pump for the last month. joining us in the next hour, oil man boone pickens. so the economy is at the top of the hour. andrew will get you up to speed on the day's other headlines. >> hedge fund manager david einhorn is taking his apple campaign directly to shareholders. he's going to be hosting a conference call today to argue the merits of distributing hedging preferred stock which, of course, is what this big debate is about. einhorn is battling and seeking an injunction next week to abolish a system for issuing preferred stock. i got a letter overnight from the nation's foundation which has a stake in apple and they are pushing back against david einhorn, something we should probably talk about a little later. >> we will. >> also in the news this morning, boeing is expected to meet with the faa tomorrow and launch a formal plan to get its grounded 787 back into service. the company will be proposing a resign of the dreamliner's batteries. officials say the jets could be back in the air within two months. >>> finally, appear highser bush, inbev want a court to grant a sho
first step toward getting federal spending under control in a way that would ultimately help the economy. >> let we get back to my first, if sequestration isn't, maybe we'd get as many as we might have if we spent money and if we're at the status quo. >> they're talking as far as jobs are concerned and the larger economy. if the government spends less in the larger economy, then it would cost some jobs overall. as far as the-- >> meaning slow growth, rather than cost jobs. >> exactly. as far as the military is concerned, there's a lot of controversy about this. you have a lot of republicans who are against sequestration, solely on the grounds of cuts to the federal government, excuse me to the defense department and you've heard today, leon panetta talking about hundreds of thousands of workers who will be furloughed and talked about damage to combat readiness and say there's an omb report, management and budget which says that they believe that the secretary of defense, and the president, do have the discretion to move money around so that combat readiness would not be affected by these
world when you decide chopping down the government and hurting the economy is the smart move. but bring it all down is now the hard right battle cry. slash spending, short the pentagon. crew up traffic control whatever raises the noise level, bashes the democrats and lowers hope. is this the tea party dream? is this john boehner's version of feeding time at the zoo, giving the crazies what they want so they will sit in their seats and behave? is this final payment to insanity the last vestige of what calm republicanism is ready to cough up? but how else can you explain the readiness of the gop leadership to let this fraken stein's monster, it doomsday machine, this sequestration go all out berserk? how else can we understand the party of lincoln doing such economic damage to the republic, such damage and moral to the people. democrat ed rendell and republican michael steele. gentlemen, i want to start with you, michael, because i know you will disagree with me and that's what this is about. i read a lot of good reporting today, not analysis, but good reporting from your side of the aisl
. a protester who interrupts the rally, saying enough, but a failing economy makes predictions difficult. the former cruise ship crooner may not win, but he may end up with influence preventing a stable government and causing new concerns in europe. >> from italy to oscar. this sunday everyone in hollywood will be on hand to see who will go home with an academy award. no one blockbuster is a film called fresh guacamole which has made history for being so short. tom explains all. >> he is probably walking the streets of los angeles. he has made academy award history by creating a short as film and never nominated for oscar. his film documents in one minute 30 seconds the making of opel of guacamole. >> it is looking at richard the making of guacamole. >> it is looking at cooking in a different way. the idea is to separate everyday things that have no food connotations for the appetizing ingredients in a traditional and who recipe. your parents always said, do not play with your food. i like to play with my food. >> he collaborated on the phone. it took four months to put it together. >> i
misconception that he land immediately afterwards. this assumption was that the economy would continue to improve or would improve. i think running and losing in 2008 was liberating for him. he found that he could be happy. week at talking -- we kept talking. he wanted to talk about it. we had a busy 2010 client schedule shoul. he finally said, on election day 2010, if you cannot do anything for your client, why don't we meet? ok. we can do that. my partner and i met him. we met him in boston. that was when i got a sense that he was intending to run. >> he was serious? and he made the decision? >> yet. >> covering -- yeah. >> covering the white house, he always viewed mitt romney is the face of the republican party. is that unfair? >> no. after the 2008 election, we were thinking about the future. he asked me who i thought the nominee would be in 20 20. i said, mitt romney. i knew we were heading into an economic maelstrom. i spoke earlier to a group about this opposites theory of presidential races. romney and the business background seem like the kind of person who could emerge from
'll be on the ground in milan with the latest. we'll get a view about how the country's economy could be transformed as an exclusive interview. we're hours away from retail giant walmart's earnings. we'll hear what investors expect head of the company's reporting results in light of a weak start to february. >>> and shareholders vote on rothschild about replacing the board. we'll also get a preview of this likely ending of this battle of the titans. >>> and japanese prime minister shinzo abe is heading to walk to talk to president obama. just what kind of reaction can abe expect from washington? we'll give you a preview. >>> before all that, let's recap what's happening in markets. we've seen more activity, in fact, higher volume over the last couple of sessions, really, than we've seen for much of the year. the volume is coming on a sell-off. u.s. markets fell yesterday following the release of the fed minutes. it was the worst day of the year for the s&p and nasdaq. as you can see, shedding 108 points there, a rare triple digit decline this year. energy and material stocks were the worst hit. all
they turn from the dime? from the economy from smoking hot to ice cold overnight. can we go from thinking we are working our way out of a long-term jam to game over? the buzzer, that's what was swirling through everybody's heads today. the market got whacked again. we did have a bit of a late-day comeback. the dow sang nearly 47 points. and don't forget, yesterday the worst day of the s & p for the day. today, down another 1.04%. the speed things got negatively is breath taking, too breath taking if you ask me. considering my "squawk on the street" partner, how do things flip so quickly? sequester, housing, to europe, all went from benign to pernicious in one week. is that possible? >> i think things got more mixed, less positive. mixed dada doesn't jive with a market up 8%, where we were when things turned sour. not so negative. we should give up this week's gains. i said for many, too much negativity to handle without taking aggressive selling action. i get that. i don't dismiss anything as important as the huge down turn in commodities, the weaker auto and housing sales. the chatter of th
on the economy if it were to take place. >> there were others like howard dean suggesting the president should let the sequester happen. to slice the pentagon's budget. dean telling the huffington post i'm in favor of the sequester. it's tough on things i care about a lot but the fact of the matter is you are not going to get another chance to cut the defense budget in the way it needs to be cut. white house officials disagree. as an outgoing defense secretary leon panetta who warned such deep cuts could leave america with a second rate military. you will remember republicans were furious before the election that the white house did not follow the warren act that requires employers to warn employees about the potential lay-offs. since furlough notices are only going out now, defense officials say they work at the pentagon until late april. even if the sequest starts on march 1. at the white house, ed henry. fox news. >> bret: the pentagon's budget chief says the effects of the cuts will be felt nationwide. he says the biggest potential losses will be in california, texas, georgia and virginia.
in this economy. this is not a good thing. gerri: i want to take you back to something that you just said that i have heard before and i think is really interesting. you say obamacare will collapse under its own weight. how is that going to happen? >> well, i think that that tax burden is causing revolt. i think you're going to see a real problems with the implementation of this. states are having trouble putting these exchanges together other states are not going to do it. i think at every step of the way they are missing deadlines and the implementation. gerri: well, the compliance rate, i think it will be interesting to see you get someone in goes a long illness. you have been absolutely right. you know, we have been talking a lot about the different things that people have to do. h&r block and feels like they have to educate people on what they're going to end up paying because they realized that a lot of their customers who are low-income will end up losing there refunds because of it. there are so many unintended consequences. are you hearing from your constituents about this? are they ups
has come up from the economy improving. and some tenants have been displaced who have taken up other places there's not layoff a lot on the port to lease. i should say those vacancy rates don't include the buildings we're in today or the vacant land. the other indicator we use is the annual revenues that has been hoover over 4 percent. the bigger story is we've got one account that repeals half of the out standing amount and once we're able to resolve that the delinquent rate will drop. now predictably we lost money in the industrial space storage facilities and parking lot this was due to the america's cup project as well as the displacement where the crews ship term is being built. we need the city to rehe bureaus us dues to some complications has not generated revenue for us however, we're expecting a revenue reimburse time. a lot of those costs have been offset by parking lot meter funds >> good afternoon commissioner this is marilyn i'm from the medical examiner division financial analysts. on the maritime does the revenue is up by 21.4 percent. and it's from two sectors cargo.
immediately afterwards. -- planned to run it immediately afterwards. this assumption was that the economy would continue to improve or would improve. i think running and losing in 2008 was liberating for him. he found that he could be happy. we kept talking. he wanted to talk about it. we had a busy 2010 client schedule. he finally said, on election day 2010, if you cannot do anything for your client, why don't we meet? ok. we can do that. my partner and i met him. we met him in boston. at his condo. that was when i got a sense that he was intending to run. >> he was serious? and he made the decision? >> yeah. >> covering the white house, he always viewed mitt romney is the face of the republican party. is that unfair? >> no. after the 2008 election, we were thinking about the future. he asked me who i thought the nominee would be in 20 20. i said, mitt romney. i knew we were heading into an economic maelstrom. i spoke earlier to a group about this opposites theory of presidential races. romney and the business background seem like the kind of person who could emerge from that. on electio
now, a tremor will hit the american economy that is both unwelcome and unnecessary. it is an across-the-board cut in spending that, according to some estimates, will cost us 750,000 american jobs. as we will hear today, there are some estimates that that is too conservative. if one takes into account the ripple effects of the tremor, it may cost us many more jobs than that, but even by the most conservative estimates, 750,000 americans who worked in contract in firms, research companies, universities, hospitals, child care centers, schools, businesses small and large around the country, and who work for the government itself, will find themselves and their country at risk. this does not need to happen. led by my friend and colleague from whom we will hear in a little while about the specifics, we put forward a constructive, common-since alternative to avoid these 750,000 layoffs. the alternative, frankly, involves closing tax loopholes that the wealthiest among us can exploit and take advantage of, and stopping mindless subsidies to huge oil companies and agribusinesses. it makes se
, the strength of our economy, the strength of our moral example, after balance those things. this university has been educating and training people to understand that balance since its very beginning. i spoke this morning with a whole group of very talented young rotc students, many who are getting ready to graduate in commission on the three programs operating on the status. -- on this campus. the university has put 1079 people into the peace corps in its 51 year history. numerous people over the course of the university history have gone to work in the state department's. then we can go broader, teach for america, or the students who have trained over generations to get jag program degrees, military law degrees here. this university is so committed to that global role that we are supposed to play as citizens and to keeping those balances of strength and balance. there's really no one today on this stage in our country where exemplifies keeping those invalid better than our speaker. we're so glad to welcome here to the ground and to the commonwealth. please give a warm welcome to secretary john
, returned $140 to our economy. every dollar. today, our scientists are mapping the human brain to unlock the answers to alzheimer's. they're developing drugs to regenerate damaged organs, devising new materials to make batteries 10 times more powerful. now is not the time to gut these job-creating investments in science and innovation. >> suarez: doctor francis collins was the head of the human genome project back then. today he's the director of the national institutes of health, which would coordinate much of the brain project. and he joins me now. good to have you back. >> nice to be with you, ray. >> suarez: there's research going on in universities around the country, institution around the world in to how the brain works. why do we need government capital flowing into this area? >> because there's a new technology opportunity here that wasn't really present four or five years ago, and the opportunity now exists in the similar way to the genome project about 30 years ago to build an intrp based upon new technology involving nanotechnology, opto genetics, some things that are pretty
, then when you achieve those economies of scale, then they are strictly price competitive in the marketplace. if you can allow, ma continue to march down that technology pathway, then we think that eventually you can see a scenario where you don't need them. we hope. you know, and i think we have seen that in our technologies. each of our technology pathways have an endpoint that is below the current prices of the income the technology they are competing with. i think you'd see sort of a natural exit point right there. >> thanks. i will take one last question. >> thanks. thanks very much for the conference. i have a question for kevin. unless i missed it, one of the priorities you did not mention was a clean energy standard, and that was a priority of previous committee chairman, and wondered why that wasn't one of the priorities of senator wyden. and if the answer is, it is no chance of passing the house, or it has no chance of passing the house -- i would be interested in hearing your thoughts on that and your thoughts on why energy standard is not a viable strategy no. >> sure. i think ac
to market, but we also have to make our economy more efficient and use less oil. >> that was president obama in an interview yesterday answering a question about rising gas prices. his response illustrates a balancing act he faces on manager issues. moving towards energy independence and also addressing climate change concerns. nothing tests that balancing act more than the decision on the keystone xl pipeline. an approval the president delayed last year due to concerns over the pipeline ae environmental impact. the keystone is back on the table. the $7 billion project would build a 2,000 mile pipeline connecting canada's oil sands to refineries in texas and the gulf of mexico delivering more than 700,000 barrels of heavy crude oil into the country every day. president obama and the state department are expected to make a decision by the end of march, but it won't be easy. last weekend tens of thousands of environmentalists took to the streets of washington in what's being billed as the largest climate rally in u.s. history. opponents of the pipeline say that the extraction of the crude oil
as holdings elsewhere outside, the teal in china, et cetera, what does it say about the global economy? >> we see everything for our business. it's continuing to do okay. you know. we have a big operation in japan. we're still doing reasonably okay in japan. china's a great growth opportunity as you saw for us. looking at brazil and other countries like that, and the u.s. market also is a good market so, you know, don't count out the u.s., so we're here. we've got to figure out some of the issues with product which we have. peter hancock has done an excellent job of bringing risk management into the u.s. marketplace so we're pretty comfortable we'll see growth around the world, and the economies so far have not really dramatically affected our business. >> bob benmosche, nice to have you on the program. >> thanks you. >> president and ceo of aing a. >>> up next, bob pisani and up next a u.s. executive calls french executives lazy. how about that. this is real, folks. he's got up in a public battle with the french. stay with us. you won't want to miss that. ss? at fidelity, we do it by merging
, stimulus program, is fundamentally good for the u.s. economy because it can stand on its own two feet, but within the market, probably there's some more risk in the smaller, lower quality, more cyclical companies that have taken the lead over the last couple of quarters, so we, for example, see real opportunities in what we believe to be high-quality growth companies, companies like oracle, colgate palmolive or one of the world's leading strong gas companies, praxair. >> an eclectic mix there. david steinberg, how would you navigate what appears to be a change in market sentiment as it pertains to the fed right now? >> i think it's just a temporary situation. watch what the fed is doing, not what they are saying. it could could very well have been a trial balloon they are sending up to maneuver, you know, the mentality of, you know, the markets. bottom line, bond yields are too low to make any money. equities can navigate different environments over the lounge run, and the fed is in a tough box with fiscal miss management out of washington where it's at. i right now don't think they h
of the local economy. we have more now on how this could impact all of us. >> with so much money off the table and billions of dollars out of the economy, and economists say everyone will feel the sting from sequestration if it does take effect, but especially the small businesses where profit margins are tight. >> a major investment in a new business just as the driving force of the local economy could take a big swipe out of spending. >> we're hoping we are not too effective but i guess we will see. >> it dream come true for several friends. >> we have taken a leap of faith in the academy. >> but right now, they fear an unpleasant reality. yearsa is a couple of into her own salon and 40% of her profits come from other than basic care cuts. she believes billions of dollars at the local economy will take a bite out of her business. >> i feel like it will effect us on a large scale. in neighborhoods where you hear a lot of shops, they rely on foot traffic and disposable income. >> a lot of people come through. this is a big area. >> across the region, construction is booming again. will there b
creating new job. the u.s. economy is not adding jobs, the claims for uninsurance benefits up pas past-- combined with continued worries ab economic growth lead the major stroke averages lower within the s&p 500 off by 9.5. >> susie: stocks weren't the only investments falling today. many commodities also ended lower, on top of steep declines yesterday. u.s. oil futures fell to there lowest point this year, closing at $92.84 a barrel. so what's at the root of the commodities sell-off, and will it continue? erika miller reports. >> reporter: selling was heavy in crude oil today, as it was in most commodities. but crude also fell on new inventory data showing a big jump in oil supplies. >> today we had an inventory number which came out, which we were expecting a build of around two million barrels. we got a build of around four million barrels. >> reporter: across the room, gold futures were little changed. although industrial metals like platinum and palladium got slammed. grain prices also plunged, with wheat hitting an eight-month low today. the thomson reuters-jefferies c.r.b. index
, now just seven days until the sequester. the economy already lies in its cross-hairs. is your 401(k) even more at risk? why you may want to check your portfolio. >>> and we'll drink about anything to score a caffeine kick but you would rub jell on your skin to get a bigger energy high? a breakthrough hopes to revolutionize a multibillion-dollar industry. shark tank's damon jobs is one of the guys behind it and he is here in a fox business exclusive. even when they say it's not it is always about money. adam: melissa francis is on vacation. i'm adam shapiro. we'll start tonight with a warning from bellwether wal-mart t says they're facing a sluggish start to the year because higher payroll taxes and higher gas prices are weighing on sales. here's what one wal-mart executive said in an e-mail to his colleagues. in case you haven't seen a sales report these days, february, month to date sales, are a total disaster. the worst start to a month i have seen in my roughly seven years with the company. now we all know that when wal-mart gets hammered, it's not good for everyone else. so toda
five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going forward. msk(music) >> the bay area knows the orchestra. you maybe take things for granted a little bit. that is simply not the case will go on the road. the audiences go crazy. they don't see vitality like this on stage. we are capable of conveying joy when we play. msk(music) >> any performance that we do, that a program, that will be something on the program that you haven't heard before. string orchestra repertoire is pretty small. i used to be boxed into small repertoire. i kept constantly looking for new repertoire and commissioning new arrangements. if you look at the first
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